28. Coastal Land Loss in Louisiana’s Texaco Canals

Now it’s Your Turn

In the comments, please ask questions or make suggestions that will help the cartographer improve the map. Key things to think about include:

  • Does the map orient the viewer?
  • Does the data tell a story?
  • Does the map support the story being told?
  • Does the map make assumptions?
  • How could the map be more readable?
  • Are there any errors or typos?
  • Erica Milwain

    I like the bold, simple combination of black, white and yellow on this set of maps. The layout is good and I think your explanation is clear too. It is easy to compare the images from different dates.

    I didn’t know anything about this subject before I looked at this set of maps. I understand that the land has been spoiled but I am not sure what you mean by ‘land loss’. Is it now degraded land or is it actually covered with salty water? Do you mean it is being reclaimed by the sea?

    Are the gas and oil wells still operating? I was wondering whether it was possible to start efforts at restoration ?

    • Eric Nost

      Thanks for the comment! These are helpful questions to ask. Yes, this land is being converted to open water.
      I do not think there are any operational wells in the area. But that’s something to look into…

  • Åse Mitchell

    I am enjoying the color scheme used here a lot. The use of black, white and yellow goes really well with the theme of this map.
    I like how simplistic these maps are as well, as it makes interpreting the data very easy!
    I don’t have any edits to the maps themselves, but some suggestions to the text:

    – “But coastal areas around the world…” – Consider not starting the sentence with the word “But” maybe try: “Coastal areas in particular…”
    – “…fastest submerging place.” -try “fastest submerging region.” Region might be a little bit more descriptive in this sentence than place?
    – In the ‘drilled gas and oil wells section,’ consider revising the paragraph to flow a little more smoothly starting with the time period. Something like: “During the middle of the twentieth century, the hydrocarbon industry dredged these canals in order to position drilling equipment and to lay down pipelines. As a result, these canals have introduced saltwater into formerly freshwater marshes, killing plants that cannot tolerate high salinity levels, and making the area….”
    -In the ‘restoration: spoil banks’ section I think the text here could also be a bit more smooth, starting with something like: “Proposals for restoration in this area are in the works, as the need to clean up dredged material – spoil – is important. Spoil build up along canal banks have allowed storm surges to…”

    Just suggestions!

    • Eric Nost

      These are really helpful suggestions!

  • Jessica Norriss

    Does the map orient the viewer?
    Yes – really love the little circle with Louisiana!
    Does the data tell a story?
    Most definitely, have to admit it took me a minute to figure it out but then it is quite compelling!
    Does the map support the story being told?
    yes
    Does the map make assumptions?
    Are we supposed to assume the spatial extents are the same in the land loss and locations of gas/well locations?
    How could the map be more readable?
    On each of the land loss maps clip the rectangle just a little smaller so that you don’t see the white coming in from the bottom if possible
    Are there any errors or typos?
    Not that I saw!

    • Eric Nost

      Thanks for the comments! Yes, the spatial extents are the same. If you have any thoughts on how to make that clearer, we’d love to hear them. And thanks for catching the positioning of the labels….

  • overlay wells on right figs. drop soil banks (or merge, w new color)

    • Eric Nost

      Thanks for the comment! The wells should definitely be overlaid on the right figures, and the spoil banks too.

  • Mag Surround

    dear eric and meghan, great page with a great theme. my only problem: i have it hard to actually read the maps concerning scale. we see a vutout of the landscape, but is there any reference to underdstand on which scale we are? like an indication of settlement, a camparable element or something similar …. best, magnificent surroundings

    • Eric Nost

      Thanks for the comment! There’s a locator map in the first paragraph that positions Texaco Canals with reference to New Orleans. There’s also a scale bar under the first image, but we could make it more obvious…